Stay up to date with the Ring of Gullion

Sign up to ensure that you don't miss out on any Ring of Gullion news and events!

Signage and interpretation

Signage and interpretation

The Signage and Interpretation project is implemented through The Ring of Gullion Landscape Partnership Scheme. The LPS is part of the Heritage Lottery Fund’s programme to conserve and enhance some of the region’s most treasured landscapes. The LPS runs from September 2015 until August 2018.

The total budget for this project is £25,000

This project aims to create welcome focal points at the two busiest entrance points into the Ring of Gullion (Camlough and Cloghogue); improve directional signage around the Ring of Gullion; and install signage at two important heritage sites: the Dorsey Embankment and Camlough Quarry.

Project Updates

Tram to feature at gateway

Update published on: December 12, 2014

1309

The restoration of a Bessbrook Tram this week got a lift. This tram was not so fortunate and has spent its last 60 years in a field at Sturgan Brae hiding behind a bus shelter. Now, it is set to receive some much needed attention as it is diligently restored over the next 18 months in partnership with Southern Regional College at Greenbank. The first milestone in this challenging project was moving the tram to the college for the restoration work to begin. It was a dramatic site as the tram was lifted from the field and loaded up for its journey to the college.

Read the full news story here – www.ringofgullion.org/news/restoration-of-bessbrook-tram-gets-a-lift

Listen to the news on BBC here – audioboom.com/boos/2723386-restoration-of-the-newry-tram

Revealing and Interpreting Dorsey

Update published on: September 30, 2016

13530

The Dorsey Embankment is an ancient Iron-age rampart, referred to in stories as the “Doors of Emhain (Armagh)”.  A lot of the embankment has been destroyed over the centuries, however at the junction of the Tullynavall and Drumill Road, off the main Armagh to Dundalk road (A29) an imposing section, roughly six metres in height, still survives. However, over the years the earthwork had become obscured by vegetation and was visible to passers-by as no more than a high piece of hedgerow. Hard work by volunteers under the supervision of the Historic Environment Division of the Communities Department  has now revealed the dramatic shape of the earthworks

An interpretation panel was designed including a piece of original artwork by Naomi McBride showing a historical reconstruction of how the Dorsey may have looked when it was an important defence of the Kingdom.

Camlough Interpretation

Update published on: April 6, 2018

13536

A survey out of visitors was carried at Camlough Quarry and the nearby amenity site and footfall was very, very low. At the peak of summer only 2 cars parked at the site all day. It was felt that any interpretation to tell the stories of Camlough and its geology should be at a site where it would  inform good numbers of people. It was decided to move the site of this interpretation to the shore of the Camlough itself and install it as part of the new works being carried out by Northern Ireland Water to make the dam safe and improve access.

We decided to use a different type of interpretation from the standard visual panel and research revealed the perfect sustainable technology in the shape of a U-Turn-Around unit, which allows a person to wind a handle to generate the power to play a series of stories. This audio interpretation allows the transmission of far more information than a simple picture panel which as a good practice should only contain as an absolute maximum 250 words. The U-Turn-Around, on the other hand, can hold 8 stories of up to 2 minutes each.

Example of one of the stories

Members of the community in Camlough were asked what stories they wanted to hear told about the area, and four stories were chosen: The geology of Camlough; the wildlife of the lake; the story of the old hydro-electric tunnel and finally wild-water swimming and triathlons on the lake.

Stories were written as mini-plays or conversations between a local man and his grand-daughter and these were acted by local people in English and Irish

Lottery Funded
NIEA DoE N&M DC Biodiversity

Quick Contact

Ring of Gullion AONB
Crossmaglen Community Centre,
O’Fiaich Square,
Crossmaglen,
BT35 9AA.

Tel: +44 (0)28 3086 1949
Slieve Gullion Forest Park: +44 (0)28 3031 3170
Email: info@ringofgullion.org

Latest Tweets

Photo Galleries & Videos